8/7/2012–News of the Day

Leadership

  • How To Properly Define “Great Leader”–And Act Like One
    • A great leader helps a group of people identify what they want and how to get it, and then influences that group, free of coercion, to take coordinated action to achieve the desired outcomes. A great leader achieves results at a level far beyond what others achieve.
    • Leadership has three building blocks. We call these three modes of behavior the 3 As of Leadership.
      • Analyzing: Figuring out what outcomes are desired and how to achieve them.
      • Allocating: Establishing a plan to concentrate scarce resources, like money, time, and people, toward their highest and best uses, and away from areas of waste.
      • Aligning: Influencing people to behave in a coordinated way, according to the plan, to achieve the desired outcomes.

Business

  • Defend Your Sweet Spot
    • People who are great at something often don’t know exactly where their greatness comes from. They have a sense that it’s bigger than they are. And with that sense comes a fear that the magic is ephemeral and if they distract themselves it will disappear. That fear is legitimate.
  • Let Your Ideas Go
    • One such game is Fold It, which helps scientists advance their field by knowing how a protein should fold. A woman, an admin who has no bio science background, ends up being the best protein folder in the world. This is something that wouldn’t have happened if she had to first be picked, or vetted or in any other way been “allowed” to participate.
  • Have You Fallen Into The Busy Trap?
    • We are creating the Busy Trap ourselves. I think it’s a way of avoiding our fear of death. If we are in the Busy Trap, we don’t have to spend time alone, or thinking about ourselves, or thinking deeply about the stuff we are interested in. By always being tired and overworked, we get to claim that we are “productive” even if the things we are doing are pointless. We get to prove our worth by being able to declare how busy we are. But, in a lot of cases we aren’t really doing much.
    • 3 Ways To Break Out Of The “All Work” Or “No Work” Death Trap

Technical

  • 15 Ways to Split an Epic, a Team Exercise
      1. 1. Extract a smaller story by focusing on a particular user role or persona. (“Prioritize your users first, then your user stories.” — Jeff Patton) E.g.: “first time user,” “social networker,” “my mom,” etc.
      2. 2. Extract a smaller story by substituting basic utility for usability. (First make it work, then make it pretty.)
      3. 3. Extract a smaller story by splitting on CRUD (Create, Read, Update, Delete) boundaries.
      4. 4. Extract a smaller story by focusing on distinct scenarios, such as the “happy path” (main success scenario) vs. alternate (exception) flows.
      5. 5. Extract a smaller story by focusing on a simplified data set.
      6. 6. Extract a smaller story by focusing on a simplified algorithm.
      7. 7. Extract a smaller story by buying some component(s) instead of building everything yourself.
      8. 8. Extract a smaller story by discarding technologies that increase hassle, dependency, and vendor lock.
      9. 9. Extract a smaller story by substituting some manual processes for full automation.
      10. 10. Extract a smaller story by substituting batch processing for online processing.
      11. 11. Extract a smaller story by substituting generic for custom.
      12. 12. Extract a smaller story by reducing supported hardware/OS/client platforms.
      13. 13. Extract a smaller story from the acceptance criteria of another story.
      14. 14. Extract a smaller story by substituting “1” for “all.” (NOTE: Look for impliedinstances of “all,” as the word often won’t be written explicitly.)
      15. 15. Extract a smaller story by scanning for keywords such as “and,” “or,” periods, and other kinds of separators.
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One Response to 8/7/2012–News of the Day

  1. Pingback: 8/7/2012–News of the Day - Bryan Hinton's Blog

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